Tag Archives: Single Malt Scotch

At the Apex of Single Malt Scotch

Welcome back, whisky fans.  Last week—if you remember— we cracked into a bit of background on Scotch whisky, and the seductive single malt. And today, as promised, I’m narrowing our focus a bit, to a small but legendary distillery called The Dalmore.

Beginning

An enterprising chap (and future member of parliament) named Alexander Matheson founded The Dalmore Distillery in 1839, among the sloping fields of the Northern Highlands, at the banks of the Cromarty Firth, where bracing waters feed out to the North Sea. The area is known as The Black Isle, because of the dark and fertile farmland found there. In fact, The Dalmore (which means big field, big meadowland in Scotch Gaelic) was established on an operating farm. And from the jump, Matheson had everything he needed to make word class single malt: a plentiful barley crop, mineral rich water from nearby Loch Morie, and the cool climate of the north, ideal for whisky maturation.

Alexander Matheson
Alexander Matheson, founder of The Dalmore Distillery

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Introduction to Single Malt Scotch

It’s a great time to be a whisky fan (or a whiskey fan, if you must). Thanks to the swing of the pop-culture pendulum away from vodka, our on-going obsession with all things “craft,” and Don Draper’s penchant for an old fashioned, there are now more brown bottles on shelves than ever before, from all over the world. That’s exciting. But at the top of that shelf, where it’s always been, you’ll still find the granddaddy of them all, unequaled in age or complexity: single malt Scotch. (These days at Mollie Stone’s, you’ll even find the telltale silver stag on a bottle of The Dalmore, but I’m getting ahead of myself.) Continue reading